Ceramic Magnets

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Ceramic magnets are low cost, lightweight, and high energy. They are primarily made of the materials iron oxide and strontium carbonate, which are very easily attainable and comparatively low cost. Because of their low cost, they are one of the most popular permanent magnets. They are also popular due to their ability to withstand operating temperatures of up to 480 °F. BuyMagnets.com offers ceramic magnets in many different sizes, shapes, and strengths.

FAQs

Ceramic or ferrite magnets are low-cost and light-weight, and are a relatively high-energy member of the permanent magnet family. Iron oxide and strontium carbonate, the two materials in ceramic magnets, are easily attainable and available at lower costs than other materials used to make permanent magnets.

Ceramic magnets are less expensive than other permanent magnets. They also have the ability to withstand operating temperatures of up to 480°F.

Common applications for Ceramic Magnets include:

  • Numerous manufacturing or home applications
  • Speaker magnets
  • DC Motors
  • Reed switches
  • Sweepers
  • MRI's
  • Hall-Effect devices in assemblies
  • Automotive Sensors

Ceramic magnets are made using a sintering process. The wet milling process produces slurry which is fed into a die. This material is pressed into a product, which is later sintered at a high temperature. Once cooled, ceramic magnets are ground and cut to desired shapes.

The most popular ceramic grades are 5 and 8. Grades 5 and 8 are considered anisotropic grades, which are the most powerful. This means they are only magnetized in the direction they are pressed.

Ceramic magnets are brittle and break easily. When using, please be aware that ceramic magnets can possibly chip, break, or even shatter if dropped or allowed to jump to something it is attracted to.

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